Canadian History for Kids: Facts about World War 1 for kids

Posted by on Aug 30, 2014 in Sketches of Our Canada, World War One

Canadian History for Kids: Facts about World War 1 for kids

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the outbreak of World War One and Canadian History for Kids have assembled 31 remarkable stories about incredible people, places and events which helped shape our amazing nation. A grateful nation never forgets a hero.

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Canadian History for Kids: On the Homefront

Posted by on Aug 29, 2014 in Sketches of Our Canada, World War One

Canadian History for Kids: On the Homefront

During World War I over 3,000 women served with the Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps, over 40 died, and almost 200 received medals. Back at home, women also had a role to play. In the early part of World War I men had to gain their wives’ written permission to enlist in the war effort. Many wives refused knowing they could lose their husbands. Propaganda in the form of posters were posted encouraging women to allow their husbands and sons to fight for their Country.

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Canadian History for Kids: Dief and Mike

Posted by on Aug 28, 2014 in Sketches of Our Canada, World War One

Canadian History for Kids: Dief and Mike

Two of those individual stories involve political rivals and future Prime Ministers of Canada, John Diefenbaker and Lester Pearson. Former Prime Minister and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Lester B. Pearson, served during the First World War in both the Canadian Army Medical and the Royal Flying Corps. In 1917, Pearson transferred to the Royal Flying Corps, since the Royal Canadian Air Force did not exist at that time, where he served as a flying officer until being sent home with injuries from two accidents. Pearson learned to fly at an air training school in Hendon, England. He survived an aeroplane crash during his first flight.

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Canadian History for Kids: Georges Vanier

Posted by on Aug 27, 2014 in Sketches of Our Canada, World War One

Canadian History for Kids: Georges Vanier

He rose to the position of Canada 19th Governor General, but at the beginning of the First World War, Georges-Philéas Vanier, was a young man looking to offer his service to both King and Country. Georges Vanier was born on April 23, 1888 in Montreal, Quebec. In 1911 he was called to the Quebec bar and shortly thereafter began practicing law. In 1915 he enlisted in the Canadian Army. He became a recruiter and helped organize Canada’s first French-Canadian volunteer unit, the 22nd Battalion of the Canadian Expeditionary Force, also called the Vingt-deuxième Régiment or the VanDoos.

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Canadian History for Kids: Frank McGee

Posted by on Aug 26, 2014 in Sketches of Our Canada, World War One

Canadian History for Kids: Frank McGee

Frank McGee’s accomplishments are surprising, bearing in mind his best years with Ottawa’s Silver Seven came after he lost sight in one eye and before the tender age of twenty-three. ‘One-Eyed’ McGee’s record of fourteen goals in one Stanley Cup match still stands 105 years later. Born in Ottawa, Frank came from a prominent family.

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Canadian History for Kids: Lord Beaverbrook

Posted by on Aug 25, 2014 in Sketches of Our Canada, World War One

Canadian History for Kids: Lord Beaverbrook

Sir William Maxwell “Max” Aitken was born in Maple, Ontario in 1879. Raised in Newcastle, New Brunswick, he was the sixth in a family of ten children. A political figure and newspaper tycoon, Aitken got his first taste of the publishing industry at age 14 when he published his own newspaper, The Leader. Upon moving to Halifax, Nova Scotia as a young man, Aitken met his future mentor and friend, John F. Stairs, who hired him and trained him in finance.

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Canadian History for Kids: Roy Brown

Posted by on Aug 24, 2014 in Sketches of Our Canada, World War One

Canadian History for Kids: Roy Brown

Roy Brown was born on 23 December 1893 in Carleton Place, Ontario. Following his high school education he studied at business school in order to take his place running the family businesses, a flour mill and power company. Brown enlisted in 1915 as an Officer Cadet at the Army Officers’ Training Corps. Even at this early stage Brown was fascinated by the aerial war; it was a more attractive draw than trench warfare.

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