Canadian History for Kids: Crucified Canadian Soldier

Posted by on Aug 21, 2014 in Sketches of Our Canada, World War One

Canadian History for Kids: Crucified Canadian Soldier

The Crucified Canadian Soldier, a true story of the atrocities of the First World War or just war propaganda? It began in July, 1915, with a note written by a British nurse, Ursula Violet Chaloner, detailing the comments made to her by Lance Corporal C.M. Brown about a Canadian solder, a Sergeant Harry Band, who was crucified on the door of a barn with bayonets at the battle of Ypres.

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Canadian History for Kids: Crucified Canadian Soldier

Posted by on Aug 21, 2014 in Sketches of Our Canada, World War One

Canadian History for Kids: Crucified Canadian Soldier

The Crucified Canadian Soldier, a true story of the atrocities of the First World War or just war propaganda? It began in July, 1915, with a note written by a British nurse, Ursula Violet Chaloner, detailing the comments made to her by Lance Corporal C.M. Brown about a Canadian solder, a Sergeant Harry Band, who was crucified on the door of a barn with bayonets at the battle of Ypres.

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Canadian History for Kids: Klondike Joe Boyle

Posted by on Aug 20, 2014 in Sketches of Our Canada, World War One

Canadian History for Kids: Klondike Joe Boyle

Klondike Joe Boyle was a true hero and the stuff that Hollywood epics are made of. Boyle grew up in Woodstock Ontario, but the travel bug took him many places before the Klondike. He was merchant seaman, businessman and fight promoter before the gold rush lured him north in 1897. Boyle was successful in securing the rights to mining a large tract of land in the Klondike River valley. He eventually wrestled control of the Canadian Klondike Mining Company from the powerful Rothschild family.

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Canadian History for Kids: Edith Louisa Cavell

Posted by on Aug 19, 2014 in Sketches of Our Canada, World War One

Canadian History for Kids: Edith Louisa Cavell

Edith Louisa Cavell was a British nurse and an influential pioneer of modern nursing in Belgium. During the First World War she saved the lives of many soldiers, both allies and enemy. She also helped almost 200 allied soldiers escape from German occupied Belgium. By helping them escape she was arrested, court-martialled, found guilty of treason and sentenced to death. She was shot by a German firing squad on October 12, 1915. She was 49 years old at the time.

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Canadian History for Kids: Sir Sam Hughes

Posted by on Aug 18, 2014 in Sketches of Our Canada, World War One

Canadian History for Kids: Sir Sam Hughes

‘My character is unique, my ways are unique,’ Sir Sam Hughes. He was indeed unique and he had very little fear. Sir Samuel Hughes, was the Canadian Minister of Militia and Defence during World War I. Hughes was born in 1853 in the Ontario county of Durham. He taught school in eastern Ontario then in Toronto. When he was 30 he moved to Lindsay and bought the local paper the Warder, which he used to promote his views. He was first elected as Conservative Member of Parliament for Victoria North in 1891.

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Canadian History for Kids: The Newfoundland Regiment

Posted by on Aug 17, 2014 in Sketches of Our Canada, World War One

Canadian History for Kids: The Newfoundland Regiment

When Britain entered the First World War on August 4, 1914, Newfoundland and Labrador, which was then a British dominion, was suddenly at war, too. The people of Newfoundland reacted strongly to the news of war. Almost 1,000 young men signed up to join the newly-created Newfoundland Regiment by late September 1914. The regiment’s first soldiers set sail for Britain on October 3, 1914 and more soldiers would soon follow. The Newfoundlanders would train in England and Scotland for months before finally seeing action on an unexpected front—the eastern Mediterranean.

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Canadian History for Kids: Canada’s Hundred Days

Posted by on Aug 16, 2014 in Sketches of Our Canada, World War One

Canadian History for Kids: Canada’s Hundred Days

The great achievements of Canadian soldiers on battlefields such as Ypres, Vimy and Passchendaele – to name just a few – ignited a sense of national pride and a confidence that Canada could stand on the world stage alone. Our many achievements on the battlefield were capped by a three-month stretch of victories at the end of the war during what came to be known as “Canada’s Hundred Days”.

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