Canadian History for Kids: Peg Leg Joe

Posted by on Feb 10, 2014 in Black History Month Articles, Sketches of Our Canada

Canadian History for Kids: Peg Leg Joe

Peg Leg Joe was an abolitionist who led the slaves to freedom. He did so by way of the Underground Railroad. Peg Leg Joe was said to be a carpenter and a sailor who led slaves through the Underground Railroad to freedom. As his name suggests he had a prosthesis. As a conductor of the Underground Railroad he is also credited for authoring the song “Follow the Drinkin’ Gourd”.

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Canadian History for Kids: William Still

Posted by on Feb 9, 2014 in Black History Month Articles, Sketches of Our Canada

Canadian History for Kids: William Still

This Canadian History for Kids exclusive looks at the heroic deeds of William, who was a conductor on the Underground Railroad. This story is a part of our continuing Black History Month series. Many call William Still the father of the Underground Railroad. As an abolitionist leader, William Still helped hundreds of slaves escape to freedom. He was also one of the most successful Black businessmen in the history of the City of Philadelphia. Born on October 7, 1821, in Burlington County, New Jersey, he was the youngest of eighteen children of Levin and Charity Still. Both of his parents were born into slavery. His father bought his freedom and his mother escaped slavery in Maryland.

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Canadian History for Kids: Black History in Canada

Posted by on Feb 8, 2014 in Black History Month Articles, Sketches of Our Canada

Canadian History for Kids: Black History in Canada

The contributions of African-Canadians in areas such as education, politics, business, religion and entertainment has enhanced our great Canadian cultural landscapes. Here are just a few noteworthy African-Canadians personalities who changed Black History in Canada forever.

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Canadian History for Kids: Underground Railroad Facts For Kids

Posted by on Feb 7, 2014 in Black History Month Articles, Sketches of Our Canada

Canadian History for Kids: Underground Railroad Facts For Kids

During the seventeenth century, Africans were brought to the United States to work as slaves. By the mid-nineteenth century, slavery was a very common thing in the southern part of the United States. Plantation owners used slaves to work their farms. Many of them picked cotton that was sold to clothing factories in Britain. In the early 1800s, people known as abolitionists started an anti-slavery movement, and they worked to set up the Underground Railroad. The Underground Railroad was a secret network of “safe houses” that were used to help slaves reach Canada, where slavery was strictly forbidden!

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Canadian History for Kids: The Underground Railroad for Kids

Posted by on Feb 6, 2014 in Black History Month Articles, Sketches of Our Canada

Canadian History for Kids: The Underground Railroad for Kids

This Canadian History for Kids exclusive looks at the Underground Railroad. This story is a apart of our continuing Black History Month series. Was the Underground Railroad for kids, or did everyone use it? Most runaways were men between the ages of 16 and 35. Women and children escaped, too, but not in the numbers that men did. Many men made the escape and then returned for their family members or hoped that they would make it safely to join them in their new home.

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Canadian History for Kids: Alexander Milton Ross

Posted by on Feb 5, 2014 in Black History Month Articles, Sketches of Our Canada

Canadian History for Kids: Alexander Milton Ross

This Canadian History for Kids exclusive looks at the heroic deeds of Alexander Ross (The birdman), who was a conductor on the Underground Railroad . This story is a apart of our continuing Black History Month series. Alexander Milton Ross was one of the most daring of the Underground Railroad workers. He was born in Belleville, Ontario in December of 1832. Alexander Ross was an ornithologist as well as a medical doctor, and often used his passion and interest in birds as a cover for his Underground Railroad activities.

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