Canadian History for Kids: Tom Longboat

Posted by on Aug 23, 2014 in Sketches of Our Canada, World War One

Canadian History for Kids: Tom Longboat

In February 1916, Tom Longboat put aside his racing career to serve during the First World War. And what a racing career! Tom Longboat was born at Ohsweken, on the Six Nations Reserve near Brantford, Ontario, on July 4, 1887. His Onondaga Indian name was Cogwagee. When he began to race competitively, he developed the ability to save enough energy to sprint just before the finish line. This became the amazing feature of his racing style.

Read More

Canadian History for Kids: Frances Peghmagabow

Posted by on Aug 22, 2014 in Sketches of Our Canada, World War One

Canadian History for Kids: Frances Peghmagabow

There were almost 4,000 aboriginals fighting in World War I. One of those men was Frances “Peggy” Peghmagabow, born near Parry Sound, Ontario. He was the mostly highly decorated Canadian aboriginal and highest-scoring sniper with 378 confirmed kills. In August 1914, he enlisted with the 23rd Regiment, the Northern Pioneers, and became a member of the 1st Canadian Infantry Battalion, part of the 1st Canadian Division. He was nicknamed Peggy by the other members of his battalion.

Read More

Canadian History for Kids: Crucified Canadian Soldier

Posted by on Aug 21, 2014 in Sketches of Our Canada, World War One

Canadian History for Kids: Crucified Canadian Soldier

The Crucified Canadian Soldier, a true story of the atrocities of the First World War or just war propaganda? It began in July, 1915, with a note written by a British nurse, Ursula Violet Chaloner, detailing the comments made to her by Lance Corporal C.M. Brown about a Canadian solder, a Sergeant Harry Band, who was crucified on the door of a barn with bayonets at the battle of Ypres.

Read More

Canadian History for Kids: Crucified Canadian Soldier

Posted by on Aug 21, 2014 in Sketches of Our Canada, World War One

Canadian History for Kids: Crucified Canadian Soldier

The Crucified Canadian Soldier, a true story of the atrocities of the First World War or just war propaganda? It began in July, 1915, with a note written by a British nurse, Ursula Violet Chaloner, detailing the comments made to her by Lance Corporal C.M. Brown about a Canadian solder, a Sergeant Harry Band, who was crucified on the door of a barn with bayonets at the battle of Ypres.

Read More

Canadian History for Kids: Klondike Joe Boyle

Posted by on Aug 20, 2014 in Sketches of Our Canada, World War One

Canadian History for Kids: Klondike Joe Boyle

Klondike Joe Boyle was a true hero and the stuff that Hollywood epics are made of. Boyle grew up in Woodstock Ontario, but the travel bug took him many places before the Klondike. He was merchant seaman, businessman and fight promoter before the gold rush lured him north in 1897. Boyle was successful in securing the rights to mining a large tract of land in the Klondike River valley. He eventually wrestled control of the Canadian Klondike Mining Company from the powerful Rothschild family.

Read More

Canadian History for Kids: Edith Louisa Cavell

Posted by on Aug 19, 2014 in Sketches of Our Canada, World War One

Canadian History for Kids: Edith Louisa Cavell

Edith Louisa Cavell was a British nurse and an influential pioneer of modern nursing in Belgium. During the First World War she saved the lives of many soldiers, both allies and enemy. She also helped almost 200 allied soldiers escape from German occupied Belgium. By helping them escape she was arrested, court-martialled, found guilty of treason and sentenced to death. She was shot by a German firing squad on October 12, 1915. She was 49 years old at the time.

Read More

Canadian History for Kids: Sir Sam Hughes

Posted by on Aug 18, 2014 in Sketches of Our Canada, World War One

Canadian History for Kids: Sir Sam Hughes

‘My character is unique, my ways are unique,’ Sir Sam Hughes. He was indeed unique and he had very little fear. Sir Samuel Hughes, was the Canadian Minister of Militia and Defence during World War I. Hughes was born in 1853 in the Ontario county of Durham. He taught school in eastern Ontario then in Toronto. When he was 30 he moved to Lindsay and bought the local paper the Warder, which he used to promote his views. He was first elected as Conservative Member of Parliament for Victoria North in 1891.

Read More