Canadian History for Kids: The Newfoundland Regiment

Posted by on Aug 17, 2014 in Sketches of Our Canada, World War One

Canadian History for Kids: The Newfoundland Regiment

When Britain entered the First World War on August 4, 1914, Newfoundland and Labrador, which was then a British dominion, was suddenly at war, too. The people of Newfoundland reacted strongly to the news of war. Almost 1,000 young men signed up to join the newly-created Newfoundland Regiment by late September 1914. The regiment’s first soldiers set sail for Britain on October 3, 1914 and more soldiers would soon follow. The Newfoundlanders would train in England and Scotland for months before finally seeing action on an unexpected front—the eastern Mediterranean.

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Canadian History for Kids: Canada’s Hundred Days

Posted by on Aug 16, 2014 in Sketches of Our Canada, World War One

Canadian History for Kids: Canada’s Hundred Days

The great achievements of Canadian soldiers on battlefields such as Ypres, Vimy and Passchendaele – to name just a few – ignited a sense of national pride and a confidence that Canada could stand on the world stage alone. Our many achievements on the battlefield were capped by a three-month stretch of victories at the end of the war during what came to be known as “Canada’s Hundred Days”.

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Canadian History for Kids: Victoria Cross at Vimy Ridge

Posted by on Aug 15, 2014 in Sketches of Our Canada, World War One

Canadian History for Kids: Victoria Cross at Vimy Ridge

The Victoria Cross was instituted in 1856 and given to soldiers for “most conspicuous bravery or some daring or pre-eminent act of valour or self-sacrifice or extreme devotion to duty in the presence of the enemy”. It is a cross pattee with a dark brown finish and is made from cannons captured from the Russians during the Crimean War. The recipient’s rank, name and regiment are engraved on the reverse of the mounting bar.

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Canadian History for Kids: Vimy Ridge

Posted by on Aug 14, 2014 in Sketches of Our Canada, World War One

Canadian History for Kids: Vimy Ridge

Arthur Currie leads all four divisions of the Canadian Corps, capturing most of Vimy Ridge by nightfall. April 9th, 1917, Easter Monday, four Canadian military divisions attacked Vimy Ridge in northern France during the first world war. This Canadian History for Kids, Sketches of our Canada, looks at this battle and the ‘birth of a nation”.

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Canadian History for Kids: Passchendaele

Posted by on Aug 13, 2014 in Sketches of Our Canada, World War One

Canadian History for Kids: Passchendaele

Passchendaele – Battle of Mud. Canadian Commander Sir Arthur Currie was unwilling to become involved. But, slowly, step by step, the Canadian military they would take the village, and secure Passchendaele Ridge. It was a great turning point in World War 1. The Battle of Passchendaele (or Third Battle of Ypres or “Passchendaele”) was a campaign of the First World War, fought by the Canadians and their allies against the German Empire.

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Canadian History for Kids: Winnie the Pooh

Posted by on Aug 12, 2014 in Sketches of Our Canada, World War One

Canadian History for Kids: Winnie the Pooh

A little black bear cub that became an orphan when a hunter killed her mother. She was found by a trapper who brought her into White River, Ontario. Lieutenant Harry Colebourn, was attached to both the Fort Garry Horse Regiment and the Canadian Army Veterinary Corps. He bought the little bear for $20. He was headed for Val Carteir, Quebec and then on to England. Harry was born in England and came to Toronto, Ontario, Canada when he was 18. He later moved to Winnipeg, Manitoba.

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Canadian History for Kids: Billy Barker

Posted by on Aug 11, 2014 in Sketches of Our Canada, World War One

Canadian History for Kids: Billy Barker

Billy Barker was born on a family farm in Dauphin, Manitoba and grew up on the family farm, riding horses, shooting, and working as a youngster on his father’s farm and sawmill. Barker fell in love with flying after watching pioneer aviators flying Curtiss and Wright Flyer aircraft at farm exhibitions between 1910 and 1914. He was a Boy Scout at Russell, Manitoba, and a member of the 32nd Light Horse, a Non-Permanent Active Militia unit based at Roblin, Manitoba. He was in Grade 11 at Dauphin Collegiate Institute in the fall of 1914, just before his enlistment.

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