Canadian History for Kids: Valour Road

Posted by on Aug 10, 2014 in Sketches of Our Canada, World War One

Canadian History for Kids: Valour Road

Of the almost 70 Canadian soldiers who received the Victoria Cross in World War 1, three of them lived on the same street in Winnipeg Manitoba. Pine Street was a street in the West End of Winnipeg. Three soldiers, Corporal Leo Clarke, Sergeant-Major Frederick Hall and Lieutenant Robert Shankland, all grew up on that street. In World War I each received the Victoria Cross for acts of bravery during the war. In recognition of their courage Pine Street was renamed Valour Road.

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Canadian History for Kids: Alexander Young Jackson

Posted by on Aug 9, 2014 in Sketches of Our Canada, World War One

Canadian History for Kids: Alexander Young Jackson

During World War 1, Alexander Young Jackson, the Canadian artist and founding member of the Group of Seven was also an official war artist. In 1915, he enlisted in the Canadian Army with the 60th battalion. In 1916 he ended up in the trenches just outside Ypres. He was shot in the hip and shoulder at the Battle of Sanctuary Wood and was taken to a hospital in France. He was then sent to Britain to recover from his wounds.

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Canadian History for Kids: Dr. Norman Bethune

Posted by on Aug 8, 2014 in Sketches of Our Canada, World War One

Canadian History for Kids: Dr. Norman Bethune

The Canadian Army Medical Corps (CAMC) played an essential role in keeping soldiers alive. Casualties among Canadian troops in France and Belgium were so heavy that more than half of all Canadian physicians served overseas to treat them. One of those brave stretcher bearers was Dr. Norman Bethune.

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Canadian History for Kids: Frederick Banting

Posted by on Aug 7, 2014 in Sketches of Our Canada, World War One

Canadian History for Kids: Frederick Banting

Frederick Banting graduated from medical school in 1916 while the First World War was raging in Europe. He was anxious to take part in the war effort but was excluded twice because of poor eyesight. He tried again and was accepted into the Canadian Army Medical Corps. He left for France the next year and served first as a medical officer in the Amiens-Arras sector and later as medical officer with the 4th Canadian Division near Cambrai.

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Canadian History for Kids: William Stephenson

Posted by on Aug 6, 2014 in Sketches of Our Canada, World War One

Canadian History for Kids: William Stephenson

Sir William Stephenson was born William Samuel Stanger on January 23, 1897 in Winnipeg, Manitoba. He was adopted early and given his foster parents’ surname. He was a businessman, inventor, a Canadian solder, fighter pilot and some believe a spy. While a student at the University of Manitoba he invented the wire photo and then a radio facsimile method of transmitting pictures without the need of a telephone or telegraph wires. He moved to Britain in 1921 to develop and market this invention to newspapers making his fortune.

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Canadian History for Kids: The Unknown Soldier

Posted by on Aug 5, 2014 in Sketches of Our Canada, World War One

Canadian History for Kids: The Unknown Soldier

There are close to 25,000 Canadian soldiers who died in World War 1 who have remained unidentified. Their gravestones are engraved with the words “A Canadian Soldier of the Great War – known unto God”. The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier was first thought of by Britain and France in 1920 and a tomb was created at Westminster Abbey in Britain and in the Arch of Triumph in France. In Canada, the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier was created, in the year 2000, to honour all Canadians soldiers whether navy, army, air force or merchant marine, and soldier who had died or may die for their country in all past and future conflicts.

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Canadian History for Kids: The Great War

Posted by on Aug 4, 2014 in Sketches of Our Canada, World War One

Canadian History for Kids: The Great War

World War 1, for Canada, began on August 4, 1914, when Austria-Hungary declared war on Serbia. This small conflict between two countries spread rapidly: soon, Germany, Russia, Great Britain, Canada and France were all drawn into the war, largely because they were involved in treaties that obligated them to defend certain other nations. Western and eastern fronts quickly opened along the borders of Germany and Austria-Hungary.

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